Here you can find some science highlights from my own research and also some explanations of nuclear astrophysics concepts for non-experts. Enjoy!

The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation, an online publication covering the latest research.

     

November 26, 2017

You may have heard the word “isotope”. It sometimes comes up in discussions with a medical doctor, where an isotope can be used for diagnosis or treatment. Other times you might hear it in discussions about archeological findings, where isotopes are used for figuring o...

The majority of radioactive nuclei undergo beta-decay, a process in which a neutron is transformed into a proton, or vice versa. The properties that govern this process, e.g, the decay half-life and probability, depend on the internal structure of the parent and daught...

May 3, 2017

A large number of nuclear reactions take place in supernova explosions. During the explosion, a shockwave moves from the inner parts of the star towards the outer layers, and depending on the temperature and density of each of the layers different types of reactions ta...

 Article appeared in JPhys+ blog

The field of Nuclear Astrophysics is an exciting field that brings together scientists from many different communities: Stellar Observers, astrophysics modelers, meteorite experts, nuclear experimentalists and theorists, atomic physicist...

February 3, 2017

This week the SuN group is running an experiment with a stable rubidium-85 beam at ReA3. ReA3 is the re-accelerator facility at NSCL that got all the Nuclear Astrophysicists excited because it can provide unique beams at energies equivalent to stellar environments. The...

We live in an era where multi-messenger astronomical research is becoming more and more common. This means that we can study the same stellar event using a broad range of instruments; optical, gamma-ray and X-ray telescopes are just a few examples of the capabilities w...

This week’s experiment is using the SuN detector in the “stopped" beam area to study the important radionucleus Fe-60. The half life of Fe-60 is two million years and we find signatures of its presence in many different sites: in meteoritic samples, in gamma-ray telesc...

In stellar explosions, such as supernovae, chemical elements are produced in complex networks of nuclear reactions and decays, involving a large number of unstable nuclei that exist only for a tiny fraction of a second. These reaction chains produce characteristic patt...

August 8, 2016

The Summing NaI (SuN) detector is a large volume scintillator designed to detect γ rays very efficiently. In the last couple of years, SuN has been used to study relatively heavy, neutron-rich nuclei using a technique called “Total Absorption Spectroscopy” or “TAS”. Th...

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